June 18, 2015

on having your studio at home


As you probably know, the husband, our Labrador Emma and I, are living in the so called Fishbowl. It is actually an old shop on ground floor, with huge windows in front, where our studios are situated, and an appartment in the back of it. Meaning, our workspaces are only divided by a small hallway from where we're living. There are a lot different opinions out there, on what might be better. Is it  more productive to get out of the house or to get started just a footstep away, from where you'll sip your morning coffee or enjoy your dinner? It both probably has its bright and its rather difficult sides, but to me this is the most practial solution. It means short ways and one set of equipment, like computer, scanner or printer. And in my case especially, one wheelchair for the studio and everday living as well. Besides, we are having our studio dinners in my studio and can use our private kitchen, which is close to a professional one (the chef husband would argue differently here, of course), including dishes, cutlery and chairs.

Other than that, I am a great believer in art being a part of life. The idea of working in a studio, totally isolated from the outside world, doesn't appear attractive to me. I like the idea of an intersection, an atmosphere of everyday life mixed with the interpretation of it. It keeps me going and inspires me deeply.

There is one point though, we're stumbling upon once in a while. Working both as freelancers, all is fine as long as the husband has a cooking job somewhere else or when I am out and about, creating something outside of the studio. Or, these are the ideal phases, when we're involved in the same project. Once we're both here and have totally different stuff on our lists, it can get difficult.

It already begins with our work schedules; I will almost never be the first up, but will start quickly. He will go with the dog in the morning and brew coffee (I know heaven!), but then it will take him a couple of hours until he is actually getting started. I love working late, the husband prefers a proper cut around six or seven p.m. (unless he is holding cooking classes and does catering, but that will not take place in the Fishbowl). You already got the picture, I suppose.

To sychronize these not at all sychronized rhythms can be a tricky thing, and it will require a good dose of compromise and dicipline. Sometimes, like today for example, it doesn't work out at all. Is is alrady way past 10 p.m. and I am still in front of the computer. Eating some really unhealthy stuff for dinner. Well.

What can become even more difficult than plain schedule contrasts though, are energy levels and those motivational lows you'll get struck by. Sometimes, when one of us is down, the other can help and support. On other days though, it seems like our different moods dissolve one another. Leaving each of us feeling kind of blank and a bit blocked. Luckily it doesn't happen that often, but other than leaving the house or putting on our headsets and making our way seperately through that particular day, nothing might fix it. Over the years I have understood, these things simply happen. If I would be in a studio far away from home, there would be other issues to tackle. And the benefits of the Fishbowl by far outweigh its problematic moments. I am still deeply convinced about this arrangment and will keep on going to enjoy that first coffee together, before both heading in our offic or studio. Door to door.









8 comments:

  1. that sounds like a mighty good idea, that coffee in the morning, and life will be life, like you put it, you will always have trouble of some kind, and uplifting feelings as an opposite part to the equation. it think you are brave. i so want to meet you. i'm going to email you this weekend and tell you my (somewhat) tight schedule and hopefully we can grab that coffee? courage, my dear! n♥

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    1. oh, I am looking forward to this email. can't wait to meet you either. we will make it work! sunny greetings from berlin

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  2. i enjoyed your description of the interplay of personal energies in your creative space. thanks for letting us in.

    no matter how much we get along with someone else, we are all so idiosyncratic - moods, energy, motivations, inspirations, drive, schedules too.
    but i don't see them as negative things, but rather opportunities to love the other person even more. if communication is open, every nuance can be catered for. to be there as support or as space-giver is equally vital.

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    1. oh, you're most welcome, dear autumn. sharing thoughts and experiences has always made me stronger.

      I believe you're absolutely right about the opportunities to interact and love someone even more, but of course, it takes some kind of stepping back, to see it like this in the middle of a storm.

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  3. well, at least you don't live with a 9-5 guy... xoxo

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    1. haha. well, sometimes this appears very tempting to me. but I know what you mean, of course. xoxo

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  4. It's nice! I have a similar situation but not a fishbowl. My studio, Robert's work space is in both the houses in both countries. I love it and I love being with him 24-7 when we are together in a country. When we are separated in different countries, I miss that closeness. But I bet if we were together every day of every year, we'd be driving each other somewhat crazy. One day we'll find out. :D

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    1. oh wow, I didn't know that you're spliting your life between two countries. sounds inspiring and energy consuming at the same time. but I guess, that is what life actually is about, to weave it around the circumstances it is giving us and to love living it.

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